This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 2)


New works by three Montreal-based artists; Peggy Kouroumalos, Claire Milbrath, and Sherry Walchuk, each exploring ideas of home - through nostalgia, daydream, and imagination.


Peggy Kouroumalos is an artist from Toronto, Ontario, currently living in Montreal, Quebec. Through the representation of re-counted personal memories or invented open-ended narratives, her interests’ lie in creating a point of intersection from various influences from the past; art historical, cinematic, literary or cultural. By working in a free associative manner she explores our cultures voracious appetite for collecting objects and consuming images, creating her own visual language with a combination of elements driven by recurring themes of death, desire, alienation and transformation.

Kouroumalos studied drawing and painting at the Ontario College of Art and Design and graduated with a Masters of Fine Arts at Concordia University. She has exhibited her work since 2006 in various solo and group shows in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.


Claire Milbrath  is an artist and editor-in-chief of art publication ‘The Editorial Magazine’. Milbrath grew up in Victoria BC. She currently lives in Montreal in an apartment with her two best friends, and spends most of her time laying in bed painting or doing the layout for her magazine. Untrained in art, her work possesses a beautiful child-like quality as well as being comic and nostalgic. She is inspired by the naïve painters, Henri Rousseau and Seraphine Louis.

Milbrath's work is deeply informed by the Naive painters in its disregard for the rules of perspective and human form. Her body of work is centered around the character of Poor Gray, an aimless, wealthy, anxious man. Her work explores themes of gender, challenging our concepts of masculinity by depicting Gray as vulnerable, feminine, and homosexual. Humor is key in Milbrath's work. 


Sherry Walchuk lives in Mission, BC, and Montreal QC, where she completed her MFA at Concordia University.

Walchuk's practice emerged from her experience taking care of her grandpa, who wanted to die because he couldn’t make anything anymore. As a result, her work is grounded in sincere, vernacular attempts to form meaning through making: acts of puttering, fake-making and home renovations. Her work is also about care-giving: it proposes potential solutions for her family member’s problems and works with and for them. Teetering between hope and despair, wrestling with profound doubt, the work becomes about trying. Ultimately, the humanity in her spaces, objects and drawings allows us to find humour in our own fumbling attempts to move through the world. They create spaces that force us to be present in the insecurity of being and doing. The point is to make vulnerable, and to give pleasure.