Feb
13
to Feb 17

LKAP at ALAC

We are delighted to be returning to ALAC for the third year, presenting new work by Anna Breininger (LA), Erica Eyres (Glasgow), Guy Maddin (Winnipeg), Joshua Petker (LA), and Corri-Lynn Tetz (Montreal). We are deeply honoured to be the sole Canadian gallery across all three art fairs in LA (Frieze, Felix, and ALAC). To receive an advance list of works available, please contact the gallery directly.

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Dec
13
to Dec 24

Shaun Morin | Works on Wood

IMG_5659.JPG

LKAP is proud to present Shaun Morin | Works on Wood. These small paintings blend multiple facets of Morin’s 15+ year practice, including prefabs (Two-Six crew), drawings, and his wild narrative canvases.

We are lucky to be teaming up with Morin’s lifelong friend, Mike McDermott of Green Apple Skateboard Shop to present the opportunity for you to acquire smaller, fresh out the studio works by this celebrated artist.

We are also excited to partner with Tiny Bar (Josey Krahn), who’s going to be whipping up delicious cocktails for all our thirsty friends.

It’s been a year since our last Winnipeg show, and we are so looking forward to seeing you all again. For an advance pricelist/images, please email the gallery. (director (at) LKAP . ca)


Shaun Morin a.k.a The Slomotion, graduated from the University of Manitoba School of art in 2004.

His art work ranges from oil paintings on canvas to mixed media on paper as well as hand made booklets and outdoor street art installations. Morin has been exhibiting his art work nationally and internationally since 2002, including the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Plug In Institute of Art in Winnipeg, J Johnson Gallery in Florida, The MOCCA in Toronto and at La Maison Rouge in Paris. His work has been included in traveling art fairs in North America and Europe, including Paris, Miami, New York and Los Angeles.

In 2007 his work was chosen as one of the fifteen semifinalists for the Royal Bank of Canada Painting Competition. In 2013 His work was featured in the “Painting Project”, a Canadian painting survey exhibition at the Galerie UQAM in Montreal.

Morin currently lives and works in Gimli, Manitoba.

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Dec
9
to Jan 9

LKAP Editions Vol. 1

We are super excited to present the first of LKAP Editions!

Each artist was commissioned to make a multiple and the results are so so great. Our goal with this project was to make affordable works for emerging (or established) who want to own work by these exceptional artists, and haven’t been able to acquire previously… These are multiples atypical of the artists’ usual practice, making them unique. This first iteration features these 6 superstars:

LEAH SINGER

GUY MADDIN

SHAUN MORIN

AGANETHA DYCK

JEANETTE JOHNS

NEIL FARBER

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Oct
25
to Oct 29

Art Toronto | Booth C10

LKAP is proud to return to Art Toronto for the fourth time. We will present new works by an all-female roster including Kristin Nelson (Winnipeg), Erica Eyres (Glasgow), Manuela Gonzalez (NY), Anna Breininger (LA), Sherry Walchuk (Montreal), and Corri-Lynn Tetz (Montreal).


For an advance list of works available, or additional information on artists, please email the gallery directly, at director@LKAP.ca.

For more details click on the images.

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Jun
17
to Jun 30

freshly cut and softly bound

the delicacy of a flower, freshly cut and softly bound. are we all destined for the greatness we dreamt of, or are we the bastards of random consequence, set in our paths in a struggle we traded for those lofty dreams. was it a random calla lily on the side of the road some sixty miles north of san francisco that taught me a lesson; there is no plan in this, and we are left to become weeds, flowers, or forests of reason or despair. 

an artist is given a platform, and a responsibility is taken or ignored. the object made is inherently meaningful, by chance or by premeditation, and once divorced from the hands of the maker, that object takes the gaze and makes shape to some experience we have all had. how else do i translate a green slash of paint but as a blade of grass i smelled and played in as a child, had sex in as a teen, put out a cigarette in as an adult, and became buried under as a corpse? This exhibition is a study of the presentation of nature, the synthesized practices utilized to make said nature, and the artists intention in providing us with a depiction of our flawed selves in a natural environs. 

-Timo Fahler


New exhibition co-curated by Lisa Kehler + Timo Fahler (BBQLA), from June 17-30 at VACATION (24A Orchard Street, NY). Featuring work by Adam Beris (LA), Kenny Curwood (NY), Michael Dumontier (MB), Aganetha Dyck (MB), Chantal Dupas (MB), Bea Fremderman (NY), Daniel Gibson (LA), Thomas Linder (LA), Morgan Mandalay (NY), Tess Michalik (NY), Brad Phillips (ON), Joshua Petker (LA), Edward Salas (NY), Camille Schefter (LA), and Corri-Lynn Tetz (MTL).

Hours are Wednesday - Sunday, 12-7 pm or by appointment.

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Apr
19
to Apr 22

LKAP at PAPIER

Cyrus Smith, Invisible Brotherhood, 2017, acrylic, graphite, collage on paper. 65 x 50 inches

Cyrus Smith, Invisible Brotherhood, 2017, acrylic, graphite, collage on paper. 65 x 50 inches

LKAP will take part in Papier for the fourth time with a delicious exhibition of new work by Ted Barker (Winnipeg), Jeff Funnell (Winnipeg/ NY), Daniel Gibson (LA), Tess Michalik (NY), Cyrus Smith (Winnipeg), and Taylor McKimens (NY).

For advance preview, prices, and available works, please email the gallery at director@LKAP.ca.

Ted Barker, Caverns, 2018. Graphite on paper, 18 x 14 inches

Tess Michalik. Oil on paper, 16 x 12 inches

Tess Michalik. Oil on paper, 16 x 12 inches

Daniel Gibson, 2018. 

Daniel Gibson, 2018. 

Jeff Funnell, 2018. Watercolour and ink on parchment paper.

Jeff Funnell, 2018. Watercolour and ink on parchment paper.

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Aganetha Dyck at dc3 art projects
Mar
15
to Apr 14

Aganetha Dyck at dc3 art projects

LKAP is excited to present the work of Aganetha Dyck in collaboration with dc3 art projects, Edmonton, looking at Dyck’s work through the lens of humour with altered handmade and readymade objects. 

A venerable Canadian artist, Dyck is best known for her transformation of domestic objects – the canning of buttons, the shrinking of woollen suits and working with bees to add, alter and destroy found objects. Now in her 80s, Dyck has continued to work with the domestic and the readymade, with increasing degrees of humour, absurdity and wit permeating her work, influenced not only by Duchamp, but by the freedom of Winnipeg artists Neil Farber and Michael Dumontier.

Included in the exhibition are a selection of bee-altered found objects from thrift stores – a salt and pepper shaker set in the form of a man in a rocking chair and a set of distorted novelty glasses – that represent those small moments of delight in everyday life that counter routines of domesticity. With her faux-diamond tiaras and silk roses, Dyck embraces the kitsch, as these objects that symbolize regalia, celebration and love fail in their representations of such, embracing the reality of their existence.

In the recent series Shrunken Crochet, Dyck has constructed larger than life-sized anthropomorphic forms which are then shrunken down to create small figures that embrace elements of chance and surprise and exude distinctive personalities. Small waxed drawings done quickly and unconsciously reveal organic and bodily forms, while the series of altered cigarettes transform vices into amusing and senseless relics.

Humour can be used a way to disrupt, to uncover impulses, to explore ideas of gender and to confront everyday life. Here, humour pervades Dyck’s transformation of objects as the artist reflects the conditions of life in general and what it means to be human – to persist, to cope and to transform the world around you.

NOTE: This exhibition is in Edmonton, at dc3 art projects.


Aganetha Dyck (b. 1937 in Marquette, MB) is a Canadian artist who is interested in interspecies communication and environmental issues, specifically the power of the small. She was the recipient of the Manitoba Arts Council Award of Distinction in 2006, and Canada Council’s Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2007. Her work is held in numerous public and private collections including the National Gallery of Canada, Vancouver Art Gallery and the Glenbow Museum. Dyck currently lives and works in Winnipeg, MB.


dc3 art projects' Jessa Gillespie interviews Aganetha Dyck in connection with the recently presented solo exhibition in Edmonton.  Aganetha Dyck: Collaboration, Commitment, & Context

 

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Jan
25
to Jan 28

Art Los Angeles Contemporary

LKAP returns for the second time to participate in Art Los Angeles Contemporary. We will present new work by Sarah Anne Johnson, Corri-Lynn Tetz, Tess Michalik, and a new sculpture by Jon Pylypchuk. 

Sarah Anne Johnson

Corri-Lynn Tetz

Tess MIchalik

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Dec
15
7:00 PM19:00

Untitled (for your pleasure)

LKAP is pleased to present an untitled show for those in Winnipeg who crave/miss/desire/lament (not) seeing works by the gallery artists. We've gone hunting and gathering to select works by your faves and ours, and will host a one-night-only event in the iconic 'spaceship' condos, more specifically, 540 Waterfront Drive. 

We will have works by Ted Barker, Neil Farber, Tess Michalik, Paul Robles, Suzie Smith, Kristin Nelson, Krisjanis Kaktins-Gorsline, Guy Maddin, Jeanette Johns, Cyrus Smith, Corri-Lynn Tetz, Michael Dumontier + Neil Farber, Daniel Johnston, Aganetha Dyck, Robert Taite, Chantal Dupas, Shaun Morin, Sherry Walchuk and more...

 

DETAILS

Time: 7 - Late (earlier appointments available)

Address: 101-540 Waterfront Drive

Parking available on site.

Email for advance images, and pricelists.

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Oct
26
to Oct 30

Art Toronto | V05

We are delighted to once again participate at Art Toronto. This year we will present a selection of work by Tess Michalik (Brooklyn, NY), Corri-Lynn Tetz (Montreal, QC), and Robert Taite (Winnipeg, MB). We will also have Kristin Nelson's newest edition, Drink. To preview works available, please email the gallery directly.


Corri-Lynn Tetz, Light, 2017. Oil on canvas.

Corri-Lynn Tetz, Light, 2017. Oil on canvas.

Tess Michalik, Dream Baby Dream, Forever, 2017. Oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches

Tess Michalik, Dream Baby Dream, Forever, 2017. Oil on canvas, 12 x 12 inches

Robert Taite, to start, one w/ all colours, then one w/ one colour, 2017. Found latex on poplar stretcher off-cuts and MDF, canvas on poplar, 22 × 25 inches

Robert Taite, to start, one w/ all colours, then one w/ one colour, 2017. Found latex on poplar stretcher off-cuts and MDF, canvas on poplar, 22 × 25 inches

Kristin Nelson, Drink, edition of 3, 2017. woven cotton.

Kristin Nelson, Drink, edition of 3, 2017. woven cotton.

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Aug
17
to Oct 5

Aiming Too High | Two Six Reunion Show

aimingtoohigh.jpg

Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in collaboration with Graffiti Art Programming is excited to present a Two Six exhibition featuring Ian August, Shaun Morin, Melanie Rocan, Cyrus Smith, Fred Thomas, and David Wityk. For the first time in over a decade, the original members of the important Winnipeg-based graffiti art club will reunite to show both old work and new.

The exhibition will open to the public on Thursday, August 17 at the Graffiti Gallery, 109 Higgins Avenue.

 

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Jun
2
to Jun 30

Golden Hour | Rosalind Breen + Corri-Lynn Tetz

Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is proud to present Golden Hour, an exhibition of new work by Rosalind Breen (Ottawa, ON) and Corri-Lynn Tetz (Montreal, QC).

One year ago, the work of Rosalind Breen was significantly different. They were large-scale paintings of iconic (and nostalgic) characters - Willy Wonka, the Spice Girls, characters from Lord of the Flies. These characters were painted in dream-like settings and partially constructed landscapes. Corri-Lynn Tetz’ paintings of ethereal landscapes populated with blurred, nude figures with a muted palate have remained consistent. A year ago, the connection between Breen’s paintings and Corri-Lynn Tetz’ work was immediate, and obvious.  The similarities in not only execution, but in the desire to create an image with ambiguity were what had originally prompted the idea for the exhibition.

Since that time, a significant shift in Breen’s execution has resulted in a far less obvious connection, but excitingly, deeper, more symbolic ones: light and longing. Both deeply relied upon lighting and the bare minimum of information to create a narrative. Tetz notes that light has become a really important part of her paintings: “a way of signaling experience without having to illustrating the specifics of what that is. Rosalind is talking about the mundane and ambiguous and I like connecting those ideas to the historic use of light in painting and how it signaled ideas of the 'divine'.”

For Breen, another connection was through a shared sense of longing. “Sometimes when looking at the figures in our work, I feel a deep sense of longing. Longing from the characters, longing to know more about what is going on, longing to be apart of the plot. That is a theme that motivates a lot of my own work. I include fruits, pomegranates, apples, lemons and limes all to play with the archetype of desire and longing… the forbidden fruit. Beyond buttery light pouring through fields or nature, when I suggested the title I was thinking about the Golden Hour through the context of mythology and fable. It was the hour of transformation, the climatic moment of reveal... it was the point where the plot would all be come clear. Corri-Lynn and I both make such ambiguous works, that to have a show called the Golden Hour almost feels like presenting that second before the great reveal. The moment of breath held, anticipation, wonder and excitement.”

In the body of works created by Breen for Golden Hour, she aimed to explore ideas of finding myth in the mundane and ambiguous images. She drew from personal memories and desires and then reduced the images to bones through collage.  She embraced familiarity and nostalgia “to create a shared experience, to illuminate memories that bring people together in solidarity”. 

Tetz has continued her focus on ritual, and ideas of transcendent experience. Through “discarding the utopic/idyllic weight of a figure in landscape”, she has attempted to shape “evocative, interior, dreamscapes, or, spaces where my connection to painting, the figure and to the transformation of found images, filters personal experience and a temporal curiosity towards the immaterial.” 

Golden Hour opens Friday, June 2 and runs until June 30. There is an opening reception on Friday, June 2 from 6-9 pm, with both artists in attendance.


Rosalind Breen

Born in Toronto, Rosalind Breen attained a BFAH from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and in 2016 an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, Rhode Island. She has since participated in residencies in Iceland, Germany and Massachusetts. She has exhibited in shows in Rhode Island, New York, Toronto and Iceland. She is interested in the idea of shared human experience, creating environments and resurrecting mythical archetypes. She makes works with the intention to evoke nostalgia or to create cathartic, shared experiences, to illuminate memories that bring people together in solidarity.

Corri-Lynn Tetz

Corri-Lynn Tetz studied painting and drawing at Red Deer College, Emily Carr College of Art and Design and Concordia University, and now works and lives in Montreal. She has receivedthe Takao Tanabe Prize, the Helen Couture Award, and was as a finalist in the 2012 RBC Painting Competition. Most recently, she has been awarded a research and creation grant from The Conseil des Art et des Lettres du Quebec and a Project Fellowship through the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation. She was the 2016 recipient of the Brucebo Foundations Residency Scholarship and spent three months working on the island of Gotland, Sweden. Her paintings have been exhibited in Sweden and across Canada.

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May
10
to May 27

Group Show

Paul Robles, Hudson 2, 2017. Handcut monoprint.

Paul Robles, Hudson 2, 2017. Handcut monoprint.

This is the last show by gallery artists at 171 McDermot. The show will feature work by Ted Barker, Derek Dunlop, Chantal Dupas, Aganetha Dyck, Michael Dumontier, Erica Eyres, Neil Farber, Jeanette Johns, Krisjanis Kaktins-Gorsline, Guy Maddin, Shaun Morin, Kristin Nelson, Jon Pylypchuk, Paul Robles, Cyrus Smith, Suzie Smith, Robert Taite, and Rob Wakshinksi. We will also have several works from Daniel Johnston, Claire Milbrath, Peggy Kouroumalos, and Sherry Walchuk.

The exhibition will run from May 10 - May 27, with a reception to be held Friday, May 12 from 6-8 pm. Opportunities to look at portfolios, as well as the private inventory will be made available. 

While this is the last show of gallery artists, we will have one final exhibition at 171 featuring new work by Montreeal-based artist Corri-Lynn Tetz, and Toronto-based artist Rosalind Breen. 

Additional projects are in production, commencing with an exhibition by Kenneth Lavallee, Jon Pylypchuk, and Aganetha Dyck. Stay tuned for further details.

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Mar
24
to Apr 22

This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 2)

New works by three Montreal-based artists; Peggy Kouroumalos, Claire Milbrath, and Sherry Walchuk, each exploring ideas of home - through nostalgia, daydream, and imagination.


Peggy Kouroumalos is an artist from Toronto, Ontario, currently living in Montreal, Quebec. Through the representation of re-counted personal memories or invented open-ended narratives, her interests’ lie in creating a point of intersection from various influences from the past; art historical, cinematic, literary or cultural. By working in a free associative manner she explores our cultures voracious appetite for collecting objects and consuming images, creating her own visual language with a combination of elements driven by recurring themes of death, desire, alienation and transformation.

Kouroumalos studied drawing and painting at the Ontario College of Art and Design and graduated with a Masters of Fine Arts at Concordia University. She has exhibited her work since 2006 in various solo and group shows in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.


Claire Milbrath  is an artist and editor-in-chief of art publication ‘The Editorial Magazine’. Milbrath grew up in Victoria BC. She currently lives in Montreal in an apartment with her two best friends, and spends most of her time laying in bed painting or doing the layout for her magazine. Untrained in art, her work possesses a beautiful child-like quality as well as being comic and nostalgic. She is inspired by the naïve painters, Henri Rousseau and Seraphine Louis.

Milbrath's work is deeply informed by the Naive painters in its disregard for the rules of perspective and human form. Her body of work is centered around the character of Poor Gray, an aimless, wealthy, anxious man. Her work explores themes of gender, challenging our concepts of masculinity by depicting Gray as vulnerable, feminine, and homosexual. Humor is key in Milbrath's work. 


Sherry Walchuk lives in Mission, BC, and Montreal QC, where she completed her MFA at Concordia University.

Walchuk's practice emerged from her experience taking care of her grandpa, who wanted to die because he couldn’t make anything anymore. As a result, her work is grounded in sincere, vernacular attempts to form meaning through making: acts of puttering, fake-making and home renovations. Her work is also about care-giving: it proposes potential solutions for her family member’s problems and works with and for them. Teetering between hope and despair, wrestling with profound doubt, the work becomes about trying. Ultimately, the humanity in her spaces, objects and drawings allows us to find humour in our own fumbling attempts to move through the world. They create spaces that force us to be present in the insecurity of being and doing. The point is to make vulnerable, and to give pleasure.

View Event →
Mar
24
to Apr 22

This Must Be The Place (Home Pt. 2)

All photographs by Jacqueline Young

Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is proud to present This Must Be the Place (Home Pt.2), a group exhibition featuring work by Peggy KouroumalosClaire Milbrath, and Sherry Walchuk. Each artist has created work offering different, personal visions of what ‘home’ looks like. The exhibition includes 17 oil paintings and 8 pencil crayon drawings. This is the first exhibition for each of the artists with the gallery.
 
Lately, home has become a contentious concept. Well, to be honest, it always has been. One’s sense of belonging is manipulated by many things; memories, a sense of familiarity, people, ideas, or geographic elements. Following This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 1), where each artist who is either from, or currently resides in Winnipeg contributed artwork that specifically drew inspiration from their geographic location, Home Pt. 2 takes a more conceptual approach to the subject of home. Kouroumalos has created a series of oil paintings culling through the nostalgia of her youth. Music, magazines, books, posters, clothes: all are fodder for her paintings of what could have doubled as her bedroom in the early 90s.  A closet door plastered with posters of icons – Robert Smith from the Cure, Jesus and Mary Chain, Sid and Nancy –washed out and faded in the same way we now recall those memories. In another work, a five foot oil painting to be precise, an unmade bed is flanked by graffiti on the wall, a Ghoulies poster, and a mess of clothes scattered around the floor. A series of ten book jackets which were informative to the artist’s development in her teens have been reimagined, and stand as a sort of link between her younger self, and the creative mind she holds now. Nostalgia is clearly the key to Kouroumalos’ sense of home.

For Claire Milbrath, while nostalgia also guides her work, hers is less obviously connected to her past. Milbrath has created a world centered on the character Poor Gray. First imagined when she was a child, she would draw him on scraps of paper and napkins around the house growing up. Poor Gray is a character trapped within the confines of what Claire is able or willing to paint. He's an anxious man, with nothing other to do than act out the banalities of his world: waiting, resting, reading, and talking on the phone. He's lethargic, wealthy, homosexual, and a smoker. The scenes in which he is painted are reminiscent of the great rooms of the Milbrath’s childhood home and the gardens surrounding it.

Sherry Walchuk’s work is intensely personal in that it evolved from her watching her aging Grandfather deal with the realities of having to move into a personal care home.  Walchuk’s work is always intrinsically linked to the personal in that she often uses it to trouble shoot familial issues as they arise; from a series of works made specifically in response to her dad in 2013 to this series of personal care home drawings. The pencil crayon drawings are her solutions to the feeling of helplessness, or of displacement that occurs when the elderly are forced to let go of their homes. Walchuk reveals: “I thought that the people would want to be either inside a previous space of theirs or that they would want to be outside, close to nature (because now they were inside all the time and also because I felt like this would give them a sensation of more space/of infinity and it would be the most calming).

Next, the shape of the structures began to change. I had finished a residency in Banff and I thought- what would I want to be if I were in a hospital or home? And I wanted to be a rocky mountain. The structures went from a box around a bed, to individual structures around individual sites: the gurney, the wheelchair.” The works are always exhibited in plastic binder sleeves, which in a sense, provide their own little home for each drawing.

This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 2) opens on Friday, March 24 and will run until April 22. For additional images and information, contact the gallery directly at info@LKAP.ca, or (204)510-0088.  

About the Artists
 
Peggy Kouroumalos is an artist from Toronto, Ontario, currently living in Montreal, Quebec. Through the representation of re-counted personal memories or invented open-ended narratives, her interests’ lie in creating a point of intersection from various influences from the past; art historical, cinematic, literary or cultural. By working in a free associative manner she explores our cultures voracious appetite for collecting and consuming objects and images, creating her own visual language with a combination of elements driven by recurring themes of death, desire, alienation and transformation.
Kouroumalos studied drawing and painting at the Ontario College of Art and Design and graduated with a Masters of Fine Arts at Concordia University. She has exhibited her work since 2006 in various solo and group shows in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

Claire Milbrath  is an artist and editor-in-chief of art publication ‘The Editorial Magazine’. Milbrath grew up in Victoria BC. She currently lives in Montreal in an apartment with her two best friends, and spends most of her time laying in bed painting or doing the layout for her magazine. Untrained in art, her work possesses a beautiful child-like quality as well as being comic and nostalgic. She is inspired by the naïve painters, Henri Rousseau and Seraphine Louis.
Milbrath's work is deeply informed by the Naive painters in its disregard for the rules of perspective and human form. Her body of work is centered around the character of Poor Gray, an aimless, wealthy, anxious man. Her work explores themes of gender, challenging our concepts of masculinity by depicting Gray as vulnerable, feminine, and homosexual. Humor is key in Milbrath's work. 

Sherry Walchuk lives in Mission, BC, and Montreal QC, where she completed her MFA at Concordia University.
Walchuk's practice emerged from her experience taking care of her grandpa, who wanted to die because he couldn’t make anything anymore. As a result, her work is grounded in sincere, vernacular attempts to form meaning through making: acts of puttering, fake-making and home renovations. Her work is also about care-giving: it proposes potential solutions for her family member’s problems and works with and for them. Teetering between hope and despair, wrestling with profound doubt, the work becomes about trying. Ultimately, the humanity in her spaces, objects and drawings allows us to find humour in our own fumbling attempts to move through the world. They create spaces that force us to be present in the insecurity of being and doing. The point is to make vulnerable, and to give pleasure.

CBC Interview with Claire Milbrath

Global News Interview

 

View Event →
Feb
17
to Mar 17

This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 1)

Home, is where I want to be
But I guess I'm already there
I come home, she lifted up her wings
I guess that this must be the place

I can't tell one from the other
I find you, or you find me?
There was a time before we were born
If someone asks, this is where I'll be, where I'll be

Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is pleased to present This Must Be the Place (Home Pt. 1), a group show considering the variety of approaches 6 Winnipeg artists use to contemplate the impact of Winnipeg as home. The exhibition includes works from Ian August, Scott Benesiinaabandan, Erica Eyres, Sylvia Matas, Kristin Nelson, and Cyrus Smith. The exhibition opens Friday, February 17 from 6-9 and will run until March 17.

CBC Preview

Akimbo Review

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Jan
6
to Feb 11

Jeanette Johns | To Step is to Rise

EXHIBITION EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 11

Opening reception: Friday | January 6 | 6-9 pm

Artist in attendance


Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is proud to announce Jeanette John’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. To step is to rise is a collection of new drawings and prints addressing the role that our bodies play in our experience of space. For Johns, perception is not just observation and deduction, it is also the result of a pre-programmed set of assumptions and limits.

 Through three key subjects; the moon, train tracks, and stairs, Johns explores optical illusions, and the body’s natural inclination to make sense of them. Johns states, “Our bodies have evolved to work with the specific environment of Earth. The ability to see depth of space in a flat drawing is evidence that our eyes so badly want to see gravity, volume and distance at work that they can be tricked by a simple optical illusion.”

Initially employing an analytical approach, she has become well-recognized for merging mathematic and scientific understandings with creative observations, all in the search for a poetic result. To step is to rise marks a return to drafting with a series of 8 pairs of graphite drawings of staircases of different heights and widths.  Each pair is made up of a “pictorial view” in a parallel perspective which shows the object as it would appear in 3D, and a “multi-view”, which shows the object as seen from different positions.  The drawings use certain conventions from the visual language of technical drawing. The proportions of each staircase are based on the height of the most climbed mountains in the world.  The height of the stairs is in relation to the elevation of the top of the mountain and the width of the stairs is in relation to the amount of people that climb to the top of that mountain each year.

A second series in the exhibition is Right Side Up- a montage of 16 works, each 12 x 12 inches. Using an image of the moon taken by NASA and pairing it with an early image of a staircase given to MC Escher, Johns illuminates how significant orientation is to interpretation.

The remaining series deal with the effect that context places in mediating our understanding of what we are seeing. Using Joseph Albers’ theories from his book The Interaction of Colour, images of the earth and moon are manipulated, ultimately altering convex with concave, and light with dark.

The exhibition will open to the public on Friday, January 6, from 6-9 pm and will run until February 4. The artist will be in attendance. An interview with Winnipeg-based artist, Andrew Lodwick accompanies the exhibition and is available on the gallery website. For additional information, please contact the gallery via email at info@LKAP.ca, or by telephone (204)510-0088.

 


Jeanette Johns is a Montreal-based artist from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Her practice is rooted in the act of observation and the experience of looking with a particular interest in two-dimensional representations of space.

Fascinated by the subject of landscape, she uses both empirical and theoretical knowledge to consider its intersection with attributes of mathematics, patterning and geometry. As an artist her compulsion is to articulate the relationship between observation and its aesthetic experience by constructing and layering the imagery of maps, diagrams, and graphs, focusing on their two-dimensional plane geometric patterns.

Johns has taken part in exhibitions and residencies across Canada and internationally. She is the recipient of many awards and grants, including a SSHRC Graduate Scholarship. She holds a BFA Honours from the University of Manitoba and completed her MFA at Concordia University in Montreal in 2015. Her work is in both public and private collections, including the TD Bank, the Province of Manitoba, and the National Gallery of Canada.

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Nov
25
to Dec 24

Suzie Smith | one thing, then another

 

November 25 – December 24 | 2016

Opening Reception: Friday November 25 | 6-9 PM

Artist in attendance

  REVIEW in Galleries West


A given system of signs must make it possible to analyse things right down to their simplest elements; it must be able to unravel things back to their origin. But it must also show how the combinations of those elements become possible and how the complexity of things has sprung from one idea.

-Michel Foucault


Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is pleased to present Suzie Smith | one thing, then another – the artist’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. Smith will present a new body of work that plays with deconstructed systems and process through print, sculpture and animation. 

Working with a specific set of shapes, objects, and colours, the artist considers diverse possibilities through arrangement and rearrangement. Small adjustments, varied angles, and colour shifts work together to create playful new structures, often echoing slightly familiar objects.

Through setting rules for how shapes and images interact and then showing the variations together, the works become diagrams of an idea. This interest in systems and process connects directly with Smith’s interest in printmaking. In particular, the kind of push and pull between tradition and a rebelliousness to want to push against its boundaries.

Smith explains: I have created a system or structure to play within. Usually you think of a system as rigid or restrictive but in this case it frees something up, forcing me to be improvisational. The nature of the system allows room for play. The drying time of ink makes me do it quickly. I can’t question what I am doing. I have to act.

 I am interested in the idea of thinking through making and I think it is evident in some of the crayon prints- adding more rules as I go such as limited colours, limited number of lines, lines in a certain direction etc. In this case they are minimal but that isn’t to say in a different series they wouldn’t be scribbled in different ways, but there would still be a system for the messiness.

one thing, then another will introduce over 30 new works as well as a new animation. The exhibition will open to the public on November 25 and run until December 24. An opening reception will be held on Friday, November 25 from 6-9 pm, with the artist in attendance. 

Interview with Craig Love.

 


About the artist

Suzie Smith is a print based artist from Winnipeg, Canada. She graduated with a BFA degree from Concordia University (Montreal) in 2004, and a MFA from The Glasgow School of Art in 2011. She has shown both nationally and internationally and has had solo exhibitions at Atelier Circulaire (Montreal), Malaspina Printmakers (Vancouver), Open Studio (Toronto), and Ace Art (Winnipeg). Her work in both public and private collections in Canada. She is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, Canada.

For more information, images, or interview requests, please contact the gallery directly at info@LKAP.ca or 204.510.0088.

 

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Oct
28
to Oct 31

Art Toronto (Booth V06)

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Oct
14
to Nov 19

Daniel Johnston | Love Makes Me Sad

True love will find you in the end
You'll find out just who was your friend
Don't be sad, I know you will,
But don't give up until
True love will find you in the end
This is a promise with a catch
Only if you're looking can it find you
'Cause true love is searching too
But how can it recognize you
Unless you step out into the light?
Don't be sad I know you will
But don't give up until
True love finds you in the end.

-Daniel Johnston, lyrics from True Love Will Find You in the End

Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is thrilled to present the first Canadian solo show for acclaimed Texas-based artist and musician, Daniel Johnston.  Love Makes Me Sad includes 13 drawings centering on the theme of unrequited love. The subject is something Johnston has religiously addressed since he first starting making art and music in the 1980s.

 The focus of Johnston’s unrequited love is that of Laurie Allen, a friend from school who ended up marrying an undertaker (an interesting story on its own). She would, unwillingly, become Johnston’s muse for nearly 30 years as he penned countless songs and drew her likeness with even more fervor. This exhibition features a diverse collection of Johnston’s drawings ranging from 1995 to 2012.

 Equally fascinating as the drawings are the details of the artist’s life.  Diagnosed as manic depressive and bipolar, his life has been a rather consistent battle of maintaining some sense of survival equilibrium. Being continually cared for by his aging parents has enabled him to keep making music and art all of these years. The trajectory of Johnston’s career reads in waves, attracting a deep and diverse mix of supporters along the way. His music was featured in the cult classic Harmony Korine film, Kids; he performed with Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth; his music has been covered by Beck and Wilco, while Kurt Cobain famously sported his Hi! How Are You t-shirt in the 90s. In 2006 he was the subject of Jeff Feuerzeig’s award-winning documentary, The Devil and Daniel Johnston. In that same year, his drawings were included in the Whitney Biennial, curated by Chrissie Iles, curator, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Philippe Vergne, senior curator of visual arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as well as a major solo exhibition at Clementine Gallery in Chelsea.

 We can easily slip into the mindset that because Johnston suffers with mental illness that somehow the work is more ‘pure’. This happens regularly in music (Skip Spence, Roky Erikson,  even Brian Wilson), but is a supremely prevalent context for appreciating and addressing ‘outsider’ art. Think of Henry Darger, Adolf Wolflii, Bill Traylor, Judith Scott, etc. The work holds a place in the art world as a kind of true art. There is undoubtedly something sincere in Johnston’s drawings and his deceptively simplistic lyrics, but Johnston noticed early on that people craved his erratic behaviour while performing, and systematically ate up all which he could offer. There is intention here, clearly. There is a sense of self-respect, and a touch of self-indulgence that adds a level of confidence to his colossal body of work.

 

Daniel Johnston | Love Makes Me Sad, will open October 14 and run until November 20. There will be an opening reception on Friday, October 14 from 5 – 7 pm. 

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Sep
9
to Oct 8

Neil Farber | The Braided Stream


Lisa Kehler Art + Projects is proud to present Neil Farber | The Braided Stream – his first Canadian solo show in over a decade. The exhibition features 12 new paintings created through his current favoured process of layering paint, text, and collages in acrylic pouring medium.

Since the beginning, Farber has possessed the ability to create deceptively simple characters of depth. In this new exhibition, a young girl acts as the protagonist. 

In the exhibition’s accompanying interview, Farber reveals that the character grew from a decision twenty years ago to “stop making funny drawings with characters and speech bubbles and start making more surreal drawings.”  The little girl is an evolution from his globehead sculptures. “The sculptures inspired me to start using a girl as the main character in these paintings, sometimes with a globe head, but usually without, because she was just a normal girl before her head got so big.”

These rich, dense, messy, works reveal a new connection each viewing. Farber is going for exactly that. “My drawings and paintings have become more dense with characters and ideas over the years because I love the way that over saturation looks and feels…pushing that saturation level, and having the paintings be more than one kind of painting at the same time.”

The Braided Stream will run from September 9 and run until October 8, with an opening reception on Friday, September 9 from 6-8 pm. The artist will be in attendance. An interview, conducted by composer and Curator of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra’s New Music Festival, Matthew Patton, is available online at www. LKAP.ca.

Preview in Galleries West

 

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